ICE CO. SPOTLIGHT

The Spotlight will highlight topics spanning industry news, safety, product and equipment reviews, codes and much more! We look forward to a dialogue with you.

Light Up Your Holidays Safely

Thursday, November 12, 2015

Light Up Your Holidays Safely
 

Light up safely over the holidays:

  • Choose the right light for the job: light strings and other decorations are rated for indoor or outdoor use. Read the package instructions, and never exceed the recommended wattage.
  • Replace damaged electrical products (cords, plugs, ornaments).
  • Avoid plugging too many lights and decorations into an outlet. Overloaded circuits can overheat and start a fire. 
  • Use Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCI) outlets when plugging in outdoors
  • Buy holiday decorations that have the mark of an accredited certification agency on the package. 
  • Once the package is opened, remember to check for the appropriate approval sticker appearing on the cord for products incorporating light strings. 

Extension Cords/Plugs:

  • Avoid overloading circuits with plugs and extension cords—this can create overheating and result in a fire. Fuses that frequently blow and circuits that trip can indicate too many items are connected to the circuit.
  • Never remove the third prong on plugs—this "grounding pin" prevents shock in the event of electrical equipment failure.
  • Plug outdoor electrical decorations into Ground Fault (GFCI)-protected outlets.
  • Don't run extension cords under carpets, through doorways, or in places where they can be damaged by furniture 
  • Keep outdoor connections above-ground and out of puddles; don't run them across driveways and/or walkways.

Installing Decorations:

  • No more than three light strings can be safely connected together in most cases—read manufactures instructions for directions. 
  • Make sure bulbs don't touch supply cords, wires, cloth, paper, or any material that's not part of the light string.
  • Use the proper clips for securing lights and decorations. Staples and nails can damage electrical cords.
  • Check for overhead power lines before using a ladder to put up decorations, or when you're hanging lights or decorations on trees.
  • Holiday decorations aren't designed for year-round use and can deteriorate over time. Take them down when the holidays are over.

Remember to:

  • Watch that children don’t put electrical decorations or cords in their mouths.
  • Keep an eye on pets that may chew or damage electrical cords.
  • Turn off holiday lights and decorations when you leave the house or go to bed.

Get Prepared for Fall

Thursday, September 17, 2015

It may be only September, but the leaves are changing here in Oregon. This has me thinking about all the things I need to do around the house to get ready before the cold weather settles in. Even if in your neck of the woods, you are still enjoying warm sunny weather (lucky you), you'll benefit from preparing for the winter weather that is only a few months away.

                      

1. Clean Out the Gutters

All the leaves and grime that you neglected while you were out swimming, hiking, or riding your bicycle this summer have built up in your gutters. If left full of debris, clogged gutters and drains can form ice dams that prevent your drainage systems from working properly. This can lead to water seeping into your home, which can lead to all sorts of issues and extra energy costs. Save yourself the hassle of repairing a leak by simply cleaning your gutters and drains now. When you do, run water through the gutters to check for misalignments that could also cause water damage.

2. Keep the Outside Air Out and the Inside Air In

Warm air will escape out of any cracks and can make your heating system work harder and cost you more to heat your home.  Use caulk to seal cracks and openings between stationary house components like a door frame and weather stripping to seal components that move like an operable window.

3. Show Some TLC to Your Furnace

Your furnace may be a distant memory since you last powered it on, but before the cold weather descends and you must reluctantly switch it on, give it some TLC. Clean your furnace annually each autumn. Sediment build-up can cause your system to work less efficiently or potentially become a fire-hazard. Cleaning your system and getting it inspected will reduce the risks.

During the winter try to change your filter regularly; a dirty filter will decrease air flow and energy-efficiency. And if your furnace is ready to be replaced, buy an energy-efficient model. It will save you money and energy each month!

4. Get Your Ducts in a Row

Your ducts are often times out of sight, out of mind, tucked away in the attic or basement, but a home with central heating can lose about 20% of the air that moves through the duct system. Make sure your ducts are in order by properly sealing and insulating them. Tightly sealed and insulated ducts can potentially reduce your annual energy bills by $120 or more! 


Smoke Alarm Safety

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

 

Clear the air with these smoke alarm facts!

 

Did you know?

Three out of every five home fire deaths happen in homes where there are no smoke alarms present, or no working smoke alarms. Most home fire deaths occur because people are sleeping when a fire breaks out.

 

Why take the chance?

By having a working smoke alarm, the chances that it will wake up the occupants of the home and allow them to get out safely, is greatly increased! Prepare your home against the dangers of smoke inhalation with the right equipment, proper installation and an exit plan. 

 

 

Types of Smoke Detectors

There are many smoke alarm brands, but which is the best? All of these brands fall under two basic types: ionization and photoelectric. Each one detects a different type of fire – but since no one can predict what type of fire may start, the USFA recommends that every home install both types of alarms or a dual sensor smoke alarm.

 

A dual sensor alarm contains both photoelectric and ionization sensors. There are even smoke alarms equipped with strobe lights and vibrations to alert those who are unable to hear a standard alarm. 

 

 

 

 

Where To Place Smoke Alarms

Be sure to place an alarm everywhere that needs protection – every floor! Each bedroom and hallway outside of the bedrooms needs a smoke alarm on the ceiling. The manufacturer’s instructions will offer more assistance on the best place to put your alarm. Know when to call in an expert - only qualified electricians should install hardwired smoke alarms. 

 

 

 

 

Create Exit Plans

Finally, take the time to create and learn exit plans with the whole family. Every room should have an exit plan – the quickest and safest way to get outside. Be sure to practice these exit plans, especially if you have younger children! This will help them to remember the exit strategies in case of an emergency.

 

Keep it safe and remember to make Summer 2014 memorable!


Summer Hazards

Friday, June 06, 2014



Summer vacation is upon us and there will be children out and about, enjoying their break from school. In this blog we are going to take a break from our usual topics to touch on some summer hazards that children may come across and what parents should look for in order to keep their children safe!

We touched on drowning along with electrical shock in our last blog, so we are going to focus on four more hazards to be on the lookout for.



Bicycle Injuries

Broken bones are the most common injuries that come from falling from a bicycle, but without proper safety equipment, some injuries can be fatal. Over 26,000 traumatic brain injuries happen each year from children falling from bicycles while not wearing a proper helmet. Head injuries are life threatening and can be deadly. These traumatic injuries can happen in your own driveway so make sure your child has a proper fitting helmet and don’t allow them to ride on the street until they are in their pre-teen/early teen years and properly understand the rules of the road.



Falling

Children falling from playground equipment, trampolines or in the house, account for over 2.8 million injuries per year and 4% of child deaths. Make sure that all windows have proper screens and be sure to have proper supervision when children are playing on any equipment, especially supervision on younger children and toddlers. Be sure that no children are climbing higher than 4 feet without proper assistance and that all playground equipment has proper cushioning and there are no exposed sharp edges or bolts.



Burns

Children can get burns from campfires, cooking or fireworks. In your home, make sure to have stove guards, smoke alarms and do not have home fireworks, go and watch ones run by professionals. Burns cause almost 9% unintentional deaths in children.



Poisoning

Medications, cleaners, cosmetics and citronella oil are all examples of poisons that children can get into and cause harmful reactions or death. Over 300 children are treated for poisoning each day and at least 2 of them die. Poisoning causes 3.9% of deaths in children. Be sure to keep chemicals out of sight and look for any chemicals within reach. Be sure to keep the Poison Control Center number by your phone.  1 – 800 – 222 – 1222

 

Don’t let your child become one of these statistics. Supervision is KEY.

Be safe, have fun and enjoy the summer!


Summer Fun

Saturday, May 31, 2014


The WARMER it gets the CLOSER it gets...


And you KNOW what that means.....





June, July & August are packed full with fun water activities, family vacations, and some much needed R&R!!


Water activities are great ways you can cool off and keep active during these next few months, which makes this is the perfect time to remind our fellow readers about the simple tips that we all easily forget on the long wait to summertime.




SAFETY BY THE WATER,

 SAFETY IN THE WATER,

AND NEAR THE WATER, 

SAVES LIVES!!!



"TEN people die EVERYDAY from drowning!!! One in five of those people are CHILDREN ages fourteen and younger. Drowning ranks 5th among the leading causes of unintentional injury deaths in the United States." -Centers for Disease Control and Prevention




A less common, but incredibly deadly danger when it comes to swimming, is electrical shock. Pool lights can have faulty wiring or can have products that are not properly grounded. If a person is not killed immediately from the shock, they can be rendered immobile and unable to call for help, resulting in drowning.




When looking for electrical hazards, keep in mind:

-          Underwater lighting/faulty wiring

-          Aging or neglected wiring

-          Underground pumps, washers or vacuums

-          Electrical products near a pool that could potentially fall in (IE. Radios)


Always be ALERT & ACTIVE during all water activities. It can make the difference!!


(Interested in more facts regarding Water-related injuries in the United States? Check out this articleUnintentional Drowning: Get the Facts)

Make pool safety a priority in 2014!


IES

Monday, September 16, 2013

Jeff Kramer of Phillips demonstrates (in a presentation posted on the website of the Illuminating Engineering Society’s Portland, Oregon Section), that LEDs are taking over, with this picture of a beautiful bridge in Sao Paolo, Brazil:

 

And speaking of the Illuminating Engineering Society (“IES”), the IES “is the recognized technical authority on illumination. For over 100 years; its objective has been to communicate information on all aspects of good lighting practice to its members, to the lighting community, and to consumers, through a variety of programs, publications, and services.” The IES has an informative interactive website, Discover Lighting, An Introduction to Lighting, found here.

 

Enjoy exploring their website!

ICE Co. Electric

Power. Current. Grounded

 


Glimpse into MaxLite

Thursday, August 09, 2012

Cultivate:
To develop and improve [insert verb] by education or training so that it may be used by future generations.

We genuinely seek to cultivate loyal relationships with our customers and vendors and in doing so, we are pretty proud of the quality of work and materials we provide. Recently we were fortunate enough to make a connection with MaxLite.

What is MaxLite you ask? MaxLite Website. They have released a number of technology driven LED 2x2 and 2x4 flat panel recessed fixtures, designed for drop in grid ceilings. Other custom mounting options available.

Compared to the typical 2-lamp fluorescent strip fixture (seen below) the MaxLite products are stellar.


The MaxLite LED conference room and class room applications below expresses how evenly distributed and smooth the light is. Equipped with full spectrum dimmers and a high tech look, we are really impressed with what MaxLite has brought to the table. I'm certain our customers would agree. We recently finished a conference space as well as private offices using a combination of the 2x2 fixtures and 2x4 fixtures. The finished spaces provided a really crisp and professional area for meetings and presentations. If we snag a couple photos of the new spaces we will post with a follow up blog.


Photos Courtesy of MaxLite Website
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