ICE CO. SPOTLIGHT

The Spotlight will highlight topics spanning industry news, safety, product and equipment reviews, codes and much more! We look forward to a dialogue with you.

Home Electrical Safety

Tuesday, January 20, 2015

Tips for Home Electrical Safety

U.S. fire departments responded to an estimated annual average of 47,820 reported home structure fires involving electrical failure or malfunction 2007-2011. These fires resulted in 455 civilian deaths, 1,518 civilian injuries and $1.5 billion in direct property damage.

With that being said, it is very important to make sure all of your electrical appliances, extension cords, light bulbs and other equipment is in good working condition.

Always ensure you replace or repair appliances that are damaged. Cracked cords, broken plugs and any burning smell from the appliance need to be looked into immediately. If you are leaving your home for a significantly long period of time, it is a good idea to turn-off and unplug heavy duty appliances such as ovens, A/C, heaters etc.

Unplug unused appliances and stow cords safely out of reach of pets, young children or hazardous situations.

Always follow appliance instructions carefully, and do not attempt amateur repairs or upgrades.

Do not staple or nail cords in position at any time; if the cord does not remain where desired, use tape or twist ties to secure it.

Cords should not be placed beneath rugs where they can become a trip hazard or where frays will not be noticeable. Furthermore, covering a cord will prevent it from keeping as cool as possible.

Do not overload outlets with multiple adapters or power strips; relocate cords instead.

 

Lastly, use bulbs that have the correct wattage requirements for each fixture. Using a higher wattage bulb can cause the fixture to overheat.




Power Outage Preparation

Thursday, February 13, 2014

POWER//OUTAGES//BLACKOUTS//BE PREPARED!


What would happen if a power outage happened in your home or office RIGHT NOW? 


Would you be prepared? Or far from it?





Not only can a power outage damage your electronics and/or household items, it can be a horrible inconvenience if you are ill-prepared. 


It is best if you can formulate a plan for your home as if a two week outage is about to happen. 


Similar to house fires and natural disasters, a power outage will come when you're least expecting it. If you are already prepared for it, you won't have to panic!




Of course the first thing you think of needing are lights, of course! What about food? Heat? etc. 


To take care of the lights, it is great to have flashlights, glow sticks for the kids (it will help entertain them as well), and a lantern on hand at all times. 


Solar lights would be very ideal as well. Candles can be used as well, but make sure to blow them out before you fall asleep at night!




If you know an outage is possible, fill up your tank! You never know how bad it could get and if you need to flee, it may be hard to get gas with everyone else in the same area trying to do the same thing.


Be prepared to cook outside. You should have plenty of charcoal available. Never bring your grill inside though! Make sure to stock up on enough perishable food items that can be eaten easily with no preparation. 




Think about your pets as well! Stock up on extra food for them. 

Essential items:

  • Cooler with ice
  • WATER! Plenty of if too!
  • Battery operated radio for up to date information
  • Fresh batteries
  • Propane for grill
  • Extra gasoline for the generator
  • First aid kit
  • Matches
  • Paper goods


Click here to read ,"Power’s Out: 5 Tips for a Safe Fridge & Freezer"


Of course there are so many other things to be extra prepared! Click here for extra tips and a great article on preparing for a power outage. 


Also, make sure your pipes are in good condition. If they aren't, you might want to think about replacing them before it's too late. 


Keeping you safe and informed is our ultimate goal!


Until Next Time,

Your ICE Co Team!


 


Winter Fire Prevention

Tuesday, January 07, 2014

People are at a greater risk of electrical fires in the winter months, from the lights in and outside of your house, to the cooking in your home, and even unsafe heat sources.  


Winter officially began on December 21, and you have probably been using your heater more often than the previous months. The heater is great for keeping you warm, but it comes with consequences (if you don’t know what to do to ensure they are in fact safe).


Since a house down the street from me busted into flames last week, it got me wondering what measures need to be taken in my home, to prevent that from happening.


You are probably thinking, “That will never happen to me”, right? It CAN happen to you.




FEMA shares statistics to help citizens understand the severity and prevalence of winter fires:


  1. 905 people die in winter home fires EACH year
  2. $2,091,000,000 in property loss occurs from winter home fires
  3. 67% of winter fires occur in one- and two-family homes
  4. Cooking is the LEADING cause of all winter home fires
  5. 5PM – 8PM is the most common time for winter home fires

FEMA and NFPA.org states that heating equipment is involved in 1 in every 7 reported home fires and 1 in every 6 home fire deaths. The months that heating fires occur in half of the time are in December, January and February.


Knowing what to do and when, can help you from being a victim of a winter house fire.


Call a qualified electrician if you have:

  • Frequent problems with blowing fuses or tripping circuit breakers
  • A tingling feeling when you touch an electrical appliance
  • Discolored or warm wall outlets
  • A burning or rubbery smell coming from an appliance
  • Flickering or dimming lights
  • Sparks from an outlet

Remember to always have ALL of your electrical work done by a qualified electrician.


If you are remodeling your house or buying a new home, you should have it inspected by an electrician as well.


If you have a portable heater in your home, make sure to keep it in a secure place with nothing around it and never use an extension cord for the heater. Also, make sure to turn it off and unplug it when not in use. You should never sleep or leave your house with it on.


Make sure to keep your heater maintained and serviced on a regular basis.




It is important that you check your smoke alarm every month to make sure it is working condition. It is recommended to replace your fire alarms every 10 years.


Generators that are portable should never be used inside your house or garage. Keep it outside far away from any doors or windows.


Click here for a full list of tips customized for your home needs. 



Remember to always have an escape plan that is studied by everyone in the home. Everyone in the home should know ways to escape if something unfortunate like this happens.


Click here to create your fire safety plan online.


Keeping you safe, warm and informed is our main goal!


Until Next time,


Your ICE Co Team


Energy Efficient Products – Switching to LED Bulbs

Thursday, December 26, 2013


You have probably heard of energy efficient products before, maybe from a friend or neighbor bragging about how they saved money on their electricity bill from using these same products.

If you are like me, you are skeptical.  Can I really save money? How much? Which products should I buy? Are they all the same? 

 

This week I’m going to answer some of these specific questions, and what you are about to read, might just surprise you.

My husband has a passion for his reef aquariums in our home. This Christmas he wanted to spend a decent amount of money on some new LED light fixtures for ONE of his reef tanks. By a decent amount, I mean $600.00! For lights?

Of course, knowing my reaction, he had a couple benefits ready to unload on me. After he rambled on about how awesome they will look, he finished off his persuasion by telling me they will save us money on our electric bill and future replacement bulbs. Save? Now we’re talking!

The accounting major in me wanted the numbers, details, all of the facts. After a little digging I found out that the t5 florescent light bulbs will need to be replaced every six months, (depending on usage) at an average of $150.00. That is already an annual cost of $300.00 a year, without including the cost of electricity.

The average LED light will last around 50,000 hours. That means that the LED light will pay for its self in less than one year. The LED lights also require less energy to run all day long. 


Switching to an average perspective, I calculated the normal cost for a regular 60w house hold bulb. The results were pretty astounding. Let’s say you have a 60w bulb that runs for 4 hours a day and cost $1.44 to purchase.

The LED with the same light output only runs 7w and cost $11.99. At a rate of $13.5 cents per kilowatt hour, I would save $11.89 per year on electricity and pay for the bulb in .93 years.

The initial cost for LED lights may be more, but as I have proved to you today, they will save you money long-term. 


IES

Monday, September 16, 2013

Jeff Kramer of Phillips demonstrates (in a presentation posted on the website of the Illuminating Engineering Society’s Portland, Oregon Section), that LEDs are taking over, with this picture of a beautiful bridge in Sao Paolo, Brazil:

 

And speaking of the Illuminating Engineering Society (“IES”), the IES “is the recognized technical authority on illumination. For over 100 years; its objective has been to communicate information on all aspects of good lighting practice to its members, to the lighting community, and to consumers, through a variety of programs, publications, and services.” The IES has an informative interactive website, Discover Lighting, An Introduction to Lighting, found here.

 

Enjoy exploring their website!

ICE Co. Electric

Power. Current. Grounded

 


LED Casestudy

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

Greetings Blog Readers!

Have you seen the amazing possible uses of LEDs for your business?  Phillips has an LED Showcase on their website www.philipscolorkinetics.com/showcase/ which demonstrates the colorful use of LEDs for outdoor lighting, and explains all the features and benefits of using LEDs. Do you recognize this iconic building which takes advantage of Phillips LED technologies?

 

Or how about this one?

 

The possibilities are endless! Take a few minutes to consider how you might draw customers directly to your business using outdoor LED lighting from Phillips, and your friends here at ICE Co.

 

ICE Co. Signing Out

Power. Current. Grounded.


McNary Baseball Fields

Thursday, March 07, 2013

Greetings Blog Readers!

To start March off right ICE Co. did a project at McNary High School for their new Baseball Press Box. The weather was nice and we were glad to get started.

We did two main things while on site. The main goal was to provide power & lighting to the new Press Box. We tapped power from the existing light poles. We also corrected and repaired an issue with the existing light pole power too.

 


Great Job Jon & Josh! AND Good Luck McNary Baseball!

ICE Co. Signing Out
Power. Current. Grounded.



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